identity

Stephanie Says Hello

Allow me to introduce myself. My name is Stephanie Pellett, and I am the girl behind the alias effieboo. Don’t ask me why I’m choosing this random Tuesday to do so, but I think it’s finally time I step out from behind the curtain. Hello! Hi! Here I am!

You might be wondering: why did you have an alias? Well, I started blogging under aliases about 7 years ago, when I opened my first LiveJournal account. I had a fairly embarrassing start in the online world, but those posts can never be traced back to me, thank goodness! I chose to write anonymously because the posts were deeply personal (the boys I liked in Grade 8, my teenage angst, etc) and therefore TOP SECRET. Over the years, aliases stuck because of my mother’s worries about anonymity in this crazy online world – and I agree that privacy is important. Yet the more I wrote and the more I heard positive feedback, the more I was irked that it was anonymous. That nobody knew who I was, and it was hard to connect with them. That my good work was a secret in my “real” life. This feeling has been growing ever since, and I think I’ve finally worked up enough courage to be myself, out loud, online. I’ve finally outgrown the girl that was effieboo.

And while most of my friends and family know of my blog and know that it’s me, the rest of you don’t! So let’s remedy that, shall we? Let’s cut away some of the mystery, and get down to the nitty gritty. You can call me Steph.

  • I have two sisters, a Golden Retriever, two kitties, a Mom and a Dad back home. They’re all beautiful. I live in Montreal, by myself. I miss the family dynamic!
  • My family here primarily consists of my two whip-smart, completely hilarious best friends, and my goofy, supportive and sweet boyfriend.
  • I’m studying Psychology at McGill University. There are a lot of hills around here. Getting to class is a workout.
  • I spend my spare time writing this blog, reading excellent books, cooking, and watching Netflix.
  • I don’t like clubbing, heels, or whiny girls. I like dinners out, boots and long conversations.
  • I have no idea what I want to be when I grow up!
  • Some of my happiest moments of the last year have been getting amazing comments from the wonderful readers of this blog (Gabrielle! Rin! Isabelle! Looking at you here ladies.)

And plenty of other things I can’t think of right now. Because I’m too giddy about “coming out” to y’all, too nervous, too happy. It might sound selfish, but it’s exciting to be able to finally take credit for this blog I’ve created. Re-formatting my resume right now! :)

Thanks again to everyone who reads, and I promise nothing will change on the blog – except it’ll be more transparent and accessible.

The butterflies in my tummy say hello, too!

Stephanie

Break The Rules

Photo thanks to fulbert05

..Banish the guilt. Boot the hesitations out the window. Crack open the windows of your soul and let in the fresh air. Don’t doubt.

If you’re my age, you’re handling a tricky time. Famous psycholgist Erik Erikson (great name, huh?) proposed that humans of ages 12-18 are struggling with their identity versus role confusion. During this stage, we try to determine who we are apart from our families and what we want in our lives. If we’re unsuccessful, we experience confusion and conflict. Sounds like heavy stuff, but I’m sure you all know what I’m talking about.

Everyone experiences the same struggle to figure out “who they are”: ie. their values, opinions, likes & dislikes, preferences, attitudes, standards. Along the way, as we try to find strength in our newly shapen identity, we stick (stubbornly) to our guns about our self-imposed opinions & tastes. At times, I’ve been known to insist I hate something that I haven’t tried, since I’ve already decided it doesn’t jibe with who I’ve decided to be. I’m sure you’ve all experienced that as well, either with yourself, or with friends and family.

The point is: it’s understandable, this stubbornness. No one can fault you for trying, in this crazy world, to figure out who you are and, once you’ve got it, stick to it with every ounce of your being. It makes sense!

But never be afraid to break the rules.

Never be afraid to smash down the restrictions you’ve set for yourself, when you said “oh, no, I’m not that kind of person” or “I can’t stand zucchini” or “I never stay up past midnight” or “I only like clothes in shades of black, white or grey”. Challenge yourself. Step up to the plate and break all your own rules. Your identity is important, but nobody else cares too much about whether or not it’s consistent. Try on different hats! Experience new things! See for yourself. Never get so boxed into your identity that you don’t try things you think seem fun or interesting.

If you want to, then..

…try the wackiest fruit in the grocery store, even though it’s “too exotic for you”

…start a blog, even though you have “nothing important to say”

…read the news, even though you “don’t really care about politics”

…read the tabloids, even though “they’re much too fluffy for your taste”

…take a nap mid-day, even though that’s “highly unproductive”

…try a recipe you think looks delicious, even though “it’s much too complicated for you”

…buy a vibrator, even though “you’re not that kind of girl”

…go out to a speech instead of a club, even though “that’s totally lame & nerdy”

…cry, even though “real men don’t do that”

…sleep around (safely, of course), even though “real ladies would never”

…use the five-second rule, even though “that’s disgusting!”

…eat nothing but junk food all day, even though “you don’t even like food like that”

…go figure skating, skiing, dancing, karaokeing, surfing, biking, running, even if “you’re not very good”

do whatever you want.*

.

To a lot of you, this advice may seem totally intuitive. If it does, I applaud you. You’ve managed to keep yourself from being tied to a rigid identity. But I suspect that many of us are guilty of falling victim to this technique of saying: “that’s just not me”, and limiting ourselves from new experiences. Or, if we free ourselves from our restrictions, we feel an automatic sense of guilt about doing something outside the norm. We feel we’ve failed, somehow. I urge you (and myself) to escape this guilt. Say bye-bye!

If you feel like doing something, do it. Don’t question whether or not it’s right for you (it is, by the very nature of you wanting to do it), don’t worry that it contradicts “who you are”, don’t feel guilty about having done something you’ve previously deemed “uncool”, “unproductive” or “not like you”. Live your life first, and your identity will come later.

Happy adventuring, loves!

xoxo,

*Edit: It’s been pointed out to me that maybe some of these statements would imply going against your personal values/morals. That was not my intention! I’m not implying that you should push yourself to do anything that doesn’t jibe with your core standards. My only goal with this article was to serve as a reminder that our self-imposed ‘rules’ do not need to be so rigid. By all means, if something really isn’t you, at your very core, then don’t do it! Sorry for any misunderstanding. :) xo

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